Freud's friend Einstein, by Schmutzer

March 19, 2020

Einstein in 1921, by Ferdinand Schmutzer
Albert Einstein in 1921, by Ferdinand Schmutzer; original in the Freud Museum; image here public domain from Wikipedia.

Science historian Paul Halpern Tweeted this photo recently, saying:

Albert Einstein and psychologist Sigmund Freud greatly admired each other. Here is a portrait of Einstein, painted by Ferdinand Schmutzer, that was part of Freud’s personal collection. It is now housed in the Freud Museum, Vienna.

https://twitter.com/phalpern/status/1240371613150973954

It’s an image of Einstein I don’t recall seeing before. Einstein was not camera shy, but there are only a handful of photos of him that make the rounds regularly. I like to find other images that are less well-known, and which may offer some graphic insight into neglected facets of the man.

I did not realize that Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein regarded each other as friends, so. An interesting commentary on the times they lived and worked, I suppose. How much of each other’s work did they study, or understand?

Ferdinand Schmutzer was an Austrian professor (where?), photographer and painter, who published this picture of Einstein in 1921, the year Einstein won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the photoelectric effect. Perhaps ironically, Einstein did not win for his work on relativity, or other work more famous that photoelectric effect.

Einstein didn’t sit for this picture. Schmutzer worked from a photograph he took, or perhaps a series of photos. One photo negative was discovered in Austria in 2001. It provides an interesting comparison to the finished portrait.

Albert Einstein during a 1921 lecture in Vienna, photographed by Ferdinand Schmutzer; photo discovered in 2001. Public domain.

In his younger days, far from being a disheveled-appearing, perhaps-absent-minded professor, Einstein cut a handsome figure. Educators may note with some jealousy he had good skills on the chalkboard, too.

It looks like Sch

Einstein’s birthday was March 14. That’s Pi Day (3.14), if you’re looking for coincidences that strike a humor chord among scientists and science aficionados.


Timpanogos dressed in snow

November 27, 2019

Recently ran across this photo of Utah’s Mt. Timpanogos in the snow. You can see how majestic the mountain is dressed in white, and how its glory can bring awe and joy to people in the valley.

Photo found on Wikipedia, from January 2008.

Evening view of Mount Timpanogos from Provo, Utah, January 7, 2008. Photographer is identified only as A4GPA. Wikipedia image, Creative Commons license.

Owl watches you from Owlbuquerque

October 30, 2019

I mean, Albuquerque.

(Fans of the Owl Cafe and the Owlburger will understand.)

Owl captured by Nimble Pundit, just in time for Halloween.

Is that a great photo, or what?

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Western skies, rain clouds and a lone tree

October 15, 2019

Lonely tree in a western thunderstorm. Screen capture of Wesley Aston’s film.

Wesley Aston is a Utah-based photographer whose work I’ve admired for some time. He photographs the rocks and skies of Utah, so much of which I trekked as a youth (less, later). One of my great pleasures was to sit on a mountainside, probably long after we should have gone down the trail to safety, to watch thunderstorms push over a mountain range, plunge into a valley and rush toward us, or maybe away from us.

At the time I wished I had photographic equipment that had not really been invented yet in non-governmental circles, to capture those scenes.

Aston does that. He’s got the equipment. He knows how to use it.

This is the kind of work that should be standard fare in geography classes in public schools, but is not.

We can enjoy it here, though.

Mr. Aston posts his work at Instagram, some on YouTube. You should study it.


Day lilies

May 30, 2019

They come for but one day.

If one plants enough bulbs, the visits come every day, ephemeral as each visit is.


Photo challenge: Patterns

March 7, 2019

I don’t normally make time for these sorts of things, though I often find they lead to other blogs with great content, especially photos.

But when else would I use some of these photos?

So, for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge, a few quick patterns. See details for what you should post at Cee’s Photography.

Adobe

Adobe bricks in a house under construction, for Habitat for Humanity in Taos, New Mexico
Adobe bricks in a house under construction, for Habitat for Humanity in Taos, New Mexico.

Fractal mountain erosion, fractal clouds

Fractal erosion patterns in the mountains around San Francisco Bay, California.

Dead prickly pear cactus

Support structure of a prickly pear cactus, exposed by the death of the cactus section and weathering.

Windows on the Oquirrhs

West windows in the lobby of the Utah Museum of Natural History, campus of the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. Oquirrh Mountains on the west side of the valley visible through the windows.

I should probably post more of my photos just to make sure they get preserved somewhere. You should, too.

Tip of the old scrub brush to Deb Kroll at Unexpected in Common Hours.

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Leaving Hanksville

November 19, 2018

Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM, Department of Interior) great photographer Bob Wick captures a photo that separates the redrock lovers from everybody else.

The road seems to dead end in the mountains ahead. Nobody visible in the land for miles around. It’s either incredibly desolate and lonely, or among the most beautiful, everyday views among rocks of incredible beauty you’ll ever see and remember forever.

Caption from America's Great Outdoors, Tumblr blog of the U.S. Department of Interior: Heading south from Hanksville, Utah, towards Lake Powell, highway travelers bisect the remote Henry Mountains – the last area mapped in the lower 48. The 11,000-foot forested peaks of the main mountain range rise to the west, while two distinctive summits, Mount’s Ellsworth and Holmes, jut skyward from the rolling red sandstone mesas to the east. Known as the “Little Rockies,” these peaks are studied by geologists around the world as a classic example of igneous rocks, formed deep within the earth’s mantle, thrusting through the overlying sandstone layers. The Little Rockies have been designated as a National Natural Landmark for their geological significance. The peaks also provide habitat for desert bighorn sheep and numerous birds of prey. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands

Caption from America’s Great Outdoors, Tumblr blog of the U.S. Department of Interior: Heading south from Hanksville, Utah, towards Lake Powell, highway travelers bisect the remote Henry Mountains – the last area mapped in the lower 48. The 11,000-foot forested peaks of the main mountain range rise to the west, while two distinctive summits, Mount’s Ellsworth and Holmes, jut skyward from the rolling red sandstone mesas to the east. Known as the “Little Rockies,” these peaks are studied by geologists around the world as a classic example of igneous rocks, formed deep within the earth’s mantle, thrusting through the overlying sandstone layers. The Little Rockies have been designated as a National Natural Landmark for their geological significance. The peaks also provide habitat for desert bighorn sheep and numerous birds of prey. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands

Outdoors people in Utah usually know the Henry Mountains. There’s a buffalo herd there, open to hunting. It’s an amazing rock formation in the middle of other amazing rocks, a towering landmark for miles.

Hanksville would have to be invented by a good fiction writer if it didn’t exist, a desert town where everybody stops who passes by, with nothing really to commend it but the fact that it’s there, and populated by people of great character. Who names a town “Hanksville?”

Who wouldn’t like to be on that road?


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